Soylent Pink

ZedZed
edited March 2012 in Humor, Fun & Games
aka Pink Slime
http://www.newjerseynewsroom.com/healthquest/pink-slime-the-jell-o-like-dog-meat-still-found-in-cafeterias-and-70-of-supermarket-beef
http://blog.chron.com/momhouston/2012/03/makers-of-%E2%80%98pink-slime%E2%80%99-say-the-meat-product-is-completely-safe/
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/03/is-pink-slime-in-the-beef-at-your-grocery-store/

Yum! Just in time for grilling season!
The meat industry calls it “lean finely textured beef,” It has been called beef trimmings, and soylent pink.

But Gerald Zirnstein, a former United States Department of Agriculture scientist told ABC News that 70 percent of the ground beef found at the supermarket contains something he calls “pink slime.”

Zirnstein added, “It’s economic fraud.  It’s not fresh ground beef.  It’s a cheap substitute.”

Pink slime is created from waste trimmings. According to the Daily, it is made by grinding together connective tissue and beef scraps that usually land in dog food, and treating it with ammonia hydroxide to kill bacteria.

A 35-year veteran of the Food Safety Inspection Service, Carl Custer, said he first encountered the pink slime in the late 1990s. The USDA ruled that the former lean beef trimmings were edible. “Undersecretary JoAnn Smith pushed it through, and that was that,” Custer said, according to The Daily. “My main objection was that it was not meat. It’s more like Jell-O than hamburger.”

Smith had served as president of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association and the of the National Cattlemen’s Association in her past. According to The Raw Story, she took a position on the board of directors at Beef Products, Inc., the makers of pink slime, after leaving as undersecretary in 1993.

McDonald’s announced in February that it would no longer use the pink slime, but it is still found in a number of school cafeterias.

Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver said, according to KCPQ, “It's cheap meat given to dogs, but after it's processed it can be given to humans.”

A USDA statement said that all ground beef purchases for the National School Lunch Program include stringent pathogen testing and compliance with applicable food safety regulations.

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Pink Slime, a cheap meat filler, is in 70 percent of the ground beef sold at supermarkets and up to 25 percent of each American hamburger patty, by some estimates.

“It kind of looks like play dough,” said Kit Foshee, who was a corporate quality assurance manager at Beef Products Inc., the company that makes pink slime. “It’s pink and frozen, it’s not what the typical person would consider meat.”

As seen in the movie Food Inc., the low-grade trimmings come from the most contaminated parts of the cow and were once only used in dog food and cooking oil. But because of BPI’s treatment of the trimmings — simmering them in low heat, separating fat and tissue using a centrifuge and spraying them with ammonia gas to kill germs — the United States Department of Agriculture says it’s safe to eat.

The company calls the final product “Finely Textured Lean Beef.” It is flash frozen and boxed. Foshee says it is more like gelatin and not nutritious as ground beef because the protein comes mostly from connective tissue, not muscle meat.

“[It will] fill you up, but won’t do any good,” Foshee said.

ABC News was flooded with questions from concerned viewers following last night’s report on pink slime.

Many, like Dale Rittenhouse, wanted to know where beef with pink slime was sold.

“What stores use pink slime?” Rittenhouse wrote.

So ABC News producers traveled across the country to the meat section to see if its in the ground beef they sell. Most couldn’t tell us for sure.

“There is no way to even know from labels or even from the butchers here whether it contains pink slime,” said ABC News producer Candace Smith in New York.

“The guy at the meat counter said that he had been getting the same question all day,” said Janice McDonald in Atlanta.

ABC News emailed the top 10 grocery chains in America. Only Publix, Costco, HEB and Whole Foods responded, saying they don’t use pink slime. No word yet from the rest.

A viewer, Miles Herbert, wanted to know, “Is there any evidence that organic meat contains this pink slim?”

It turns out there isn’t. If your meat is stamped USDA Organic, it’s pure meat with no filler.

But critics say everything else is suspect because pink slime does not have to appear on the label. And the USDA is giving no indication it will force meat packers to lift the veil of secrecy any time soon.

Comments

  • Yeah, that's fucking disgusting.
  • My mother could be a butcher. She's always pointing out how the butchers hide scrap/shit bits intentionally left on to gyp her.
  • Okay, here goes, again:

    Don't buy frozen/processed patties. Don't eat fast food. Don't eat grocery-store purchased beef. It's all feed lot crap unless its specifically marked as such.


  • This does explain why I end up eating multiple burgers when I go to a cookout, but only eat a single burger at home. The cookout burgers aren't really made of meat, and therefore are not filling.
  • Okay, here goes, again:


    Don't buy frozen/processed patties. Don't eat fast food. Don't eat grocery-store purchased beef. It's all feed lot crap unless its specifically marked as such.



    I buy my meat fresh at Giant Eagle and I have no plans to stop.

    There comes a point where trying to avoid every little things gets silly.
  • We have a local amish market that we get our beef from.

    I'm assuming, much like buttons, pink slime is a bit too fancy for the amish. At least I hope so.

  • 2.FOH. said:

    We have a local amish market that we get our beef from.

    I'm assuming, much like buttons, pink slime is a bit too fancy for the amish. At least I hope so.

    Likely is. My cattle guy has an Amish butcher in Lancaster County do his dirty work, but I can't always afford to eat beef from him. Best I can do otherwise is buy all-natural or organic at the store and cross my fingers. Reality is that I don't eat that much red meat anymore. 

    And Erik, yes and no. It is entirely possible to avoid CERTAIN things, but when I walk into the meat dept cooler at work and every case has IBP or Cargill stamped on it, yes, you are correct. I'm surprised you haven't sought out a local farmer and bought a side of beef and stockpiled. 
  •  I'm surprised you haven't sought out a local farmer and bought a side of beef and stockpiled. 




    Why have a side of beef when you can have a cow?
  • 2.FOH. said:

    I'm assuming, much like buttons, pink slime is a bit too fancy for the amish. At least I hope so.

    You know what else isn't fancy? Horse meat.

    Avoid the Amish.*




    *Certain post-apocalyptic exceptions do apply.
  • What's wrong with eating horses?  They're made of meat aren't they?

    Eric, you have a cow?  How is that working out for you?
  • Horse is actually quite tasty.  

    We went to a party at one of the more colorful characters who inhabit the Genesee Valley area.  Her name is Gail and she's a blast.  Has a Scots collection that would make anybody here jealous and a great horse farm.  

    We all sit down to have dinner and the steaks are amazing (no mystery where this is going).  When Debbie commented that it might be the best steak she's had Gail replied something along the lines of it's too bad she had to put her down, but....

    The table got quiet for a few moments then the forks and knives started moving again.  

    All the people there who train and compete horses love the animals, but they are realistic enough - I hear the phrase "where there is livestock there is deadstock" often enough.
  • Even if I try horse meat someday and like it, I'll still take every opportunity to complain about the three things I hate the most: the Amish, the Dutch, and intolerance.
  • Zed said:

    What's wrong with eating horses?  They're made of meat aren't they?

    Eric, you have a cow?  How is that working out for you?



    No, I don't.

    I'm just saying that it's a better stocking up option. No need for refrigeration.
  • Horses are not good livestock to keep for food as a primary purpose. Horses should be food only as a side-effect of their natural death.

    They are far too fragile an animal to keep, that requires too much attention. Cows are far simpler.
  • We had a bull that we bought with the in-laws. He was a mean SOB.
    The FIL got a bit too comfortable with it once when feeding & it just about broke his nose.

    The steaks & burgers we got from that one were fantastic.

    We're part owners of a mule, currently. I don't suppose mule is any good...maybe on the grill?
    She's pretty old, too. Oddly enough she's retired military (& police). 


  • 2.FOH. said:



    We're part owners of a mule, currently.

    Of course you are, you 1%'er. You've probably got 40 acres too.
  • Fractional Mule Ownership and Other Signs of the $30,000 Millionaire -- buy it on Amazon.
  • Unfortunately I think we own the end that requires feeding.
  • Kill one of the many wild boar/hogs that are overrunning the countryside.
  • Mmmm... Bacon.
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