Lent

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1 Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil.
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He fasted for forty days and forty nights, 2 and afterwards he was hungry.
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The tempter approached and said to him, "If you are the Son of God, command that these stones become loaves of bread."
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3 He said in reply, "It is written: 'One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes forth from the mouth of God.'"
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4 Then the devil took him to the holy city, and made him stand on the parapet of the temple,
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and said to him, "If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down. For it is written: 'He will command his angels concerning you and 'with their hands they will support you, lest you dash your foot against a stone.'"
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Jesus answered him, "Again it is written, 'You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test.'"
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Then the devil took him up to a very high mountain, and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in their magnificence,
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and he said to him, "All these I shall give to you, if you will prostrate yourself and worship me." 5
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At this, Jesus said to him, "Get away, Satan! It is written: 'The Lord, your God, shall you worship and him alone shall you serve.'"
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Then the devil left him and, behold, angels came and ministered to him.

Comments

  • The big deal is that the passage doesn't say that we have to follow suit. It is descriptive not prescriptive. We CAN, but we don't HAVE TO.
  • My fiancee and I are giving up personal consumption for Lent. Anything that isn't a necessary expense is given up. So, for instance, if we have to pay a membership fee (gym or what have you), it's fine; if we're paying for food, it's fine; but if we're buying something else (clothes, electronics, books, etc), that's a violation. We're using it as a time to reflect on what's really necessary in our lives.

    I think the idea of using this time period to reflect on ways to limit the self in recognition of the spirit of something greater than you (similar to the asceticism of Buddhism) is a valuable activity, if one undertakes it properly.
  • said:

    We're using it as a time to reflect on what's really necessary in our lives.

    We have so much and are so disconnected from any kind of true necessity most of the time that these voluntary depravations are a brilliant idea. Clearing out the junk and easy fixes that clutter a life improve it.

    I'm thinking of giving up sobriety.
  • Guy, good point.
    said:

    We're using it as a time to reflect on what's really necessary in our lives.

    This gets a lot easier when you eliminate commercials from your life: TV commercials, radio commercials, mail spam, email spam, window shopping, and magazines & websites that hawk the latest and greatest. There were a few categories of things I was always wanting to buy (e.g., computer hardware and games). After eliminating them, I'm actually quite happy now with my four-year-old computer, though a quick visit yesterday on a review site immediately started making me discontent with what I had, even though it really is working fine for me.

    I've been on a TV fast for...five years now. After 2006 lent was over, I was like, "eh, I'll keep going."

    I've been on a video game fast now since January.

    By doing these long-term fasts, I'm seeking to eliminate idols from my life, things that get between me and devotion to God. None of these things are "bad" per se, but a self evaluation will tell you if these things are for good or if they are replacing God in any way. I was using video games as an extended distraction, taking time away from talking to Him, meditating on Him, and serving Him. I was using games as a replacement for comfort and rest instead of leaning on God. My time is better spent lifting others up than pleasuring myself. But if I weren't intentional about this, I'd just be playing games all my free time.
  • I'm giving up Lent for Lent.
  • I could have (and probably should have) said that we "get to." :cool:

    Last year I went on an Internet fast. I ended up posting on forums less than 10 times for the 40 days, versus as many as 100 times a day when I'm in a big debate somewhere.

    It is difficult for me to give up the intellectual stimulation I get from interaction with folks on the web though, so this year, I'm focusing on physical health instead. Can I remove 40 pounds in 40 days? Twenty would be good! Also have to help rehabilitate my wife who blew out her ACL over Thanksgiving riding beach cruisers on the sand at Hilton Head. She had a rough winter that culminated in surgery to remove half of her torn ACL. On top of that we both had a double dose of the flu -- bad enough to cost each of us multiple weeks of work. We're in sad shape and need to get moving before we are lumps that can't move.
  • A peer's elderly grandmother or great aunt or something, goes to church everyday. He told her that since the only thing she enjoys is going to church, she should give up going to church for lent.
  • said:

    My fiancee.

    Did we know about this?

    If not, congrats.

















    Sucker. :P
  • said:

    said:

    We're using it as a time to reflect on what's really necessary in our lives.

    We have so much and are so disconnected from any kind of true necessity most of the time that these voluntary depravations are a brilliant idea. Clearing out the junk and easy fixes that clutter a life improve it.

    I'm thinking of giving up sobriety.
    You are the master of wit and language, sir. Please accept this token of lols in appreciation.
  • I'm taking on a Lenten discipline - of being more peaceful and optimistic. I definitely need to work on being less negative about others and most of all myself.
  • said:

    A peer's elderly grandmother or great aunt or something, goes to church everyday. He told her that since the only thing she enjoys is going to church, she should give up going to church for lent.

    I had a friend over for dinner the other night and he refused the beer I offered since he gave it up for Lent. He then sadly told me about a guy who was giving up everything BUT beer for Lent. My friend was sad because he didn't think of it first. Now that's a commitment.

    Our 40 days is now more like 47 isn't it? You'd think we would have whilttled it down to a coupe of afternoons by now.
  • said:

    Our 40 days is now more like 47 isn't it? You'd think we would have whilttled it down to a coupe of afternoons by now.

    The 40 days of Lent don't include Sundays.
  • Of course they don't because Sunday is a feast day, even in Lent
  • You definitely don't want to follow the example of my friend, who gave up sex for lent, but failed to discuss it with his wife first.

    Sure enough, that night after the two of them got in bed the next night, and instead of indulging in their usual, he just gave her a peck on the cheek and rolled over to try to sleep.

    She was expecting a bit more than a peck on the cheek, so after waiting for something to happen, she finally asked him if something was wrong.

    "Nothing's wrong," he responded, "it's just that I can't. It's lent."

    "OMG!" she shrieked in anguish, "to whom, and for how long?"
  • Reminds me of a song by "King Missile"
  • Its times like these that I'm happy to be a heathen protestant.
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